The Split-level Controversy

Induction vs Exhaust

Intuitive Engineering
Are most manufacturers engineering perception
Evacuating unwanted heat from equipment enclosures in order to reach an optimum operating temperature for equipment has always been a challenge in designing computer furniture. Most manufactures of control room consoles utilize low decibel exhaust fans that are placed in the top of their consoles. We on the other hand do not subscribe to this design in most instances since the enclosure will never be cooler than the equipment inside without help. As a manufacturer who has extensively tested it products using a number of scenarios, we have determined that using induction fans is more efficient since they bring in cooler ambient room air. That is why data centers have always used chillers and pressurized floors to cool equipment.

It simply makes more sense
In 24 x 7 people environments like a dispatch center, floor pressure is not always a practical solution so we utilize the air conditioned ambient air in the room to cool equipment enclosures in our console offerings. We position induction fans that pull in cooler air at the bottom of the equipment enclosure. They draw the cooler ambient room air and create pressure that pushes the hot air created by the equipment out through vents in the top. Some other problems solved are the need for vented access doors which transmit the hot air from the equipment to the dispatcherís legs and of course increased noise levels significantly.

Reducing noise polution
If you have ever been in a NOC that has a large number of console positions, there seems to always be a continuous hum that sounds like air conditioning. In reality, itís the sound waves from the exhaust fans that are being thrown into the air. Although quiet individually, these fans produce sound waves that bounce off each other and thatís what creates this sound. It is exacerbated when there are a large number of positions in the room. Our induction fan system eliminate the problem since these unwanted sound waves are absorbed inside the enclosure.

PHONE (805) 987-0412
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americon 2017